Das “dominante” System degeneriert nach seinem Hoch und zeitgleich entstehen unabhängige Alternativen in einem parallelen System. Die Pioniere in diesem neuen System beginnen sich zu vernetzen und daraus entstehen neue Werte, Einstellungen, Verhaltensweisen und kulturelle Codes, die zur Ablösung des alte Denkens führen

Hier ein inspirierendes Video des amerikanischen Berkana Institutes darüber, wie Systeme sich in “two Loops” verändern. Das “dominante” System degeneriert nach seinem Hoch und zeitgleich entstehen unabhängige Alternativen in einem parallelen System. Die Pioniere in diesem neuen System beginnen sich zu vernetzen und daraus entstehen neue Werte, Einstellungen, Verhaltensweisen und kulturelle Codes, die zur Ablösung des alte Denkens führen. Hier noch ein kurzer Artikel zu dieser Theorie.

Ich habe den Eindruck, dass wir uns mitten in diesem Systemwechsel befinden und möchte einen positiven Beitrag dazu leisten, dass der Übergang in ein neues nachhaltiges (Wirtschafts-)System so abläuft, dass möglichst viele Menschen aus dem alten System die Vorteile des neuen erkennen und freiwillig daran teilhaben möchten. Dies ist wohl eine wichtige Funktion in meiner Berufung als Brückenbauer.

http://www.karmakonsum.de/2011/11/17/wie-der-systemwandel-theoretisch-funktioniert/

Walking Out and On

LIFECYCLE OF EMERGENCE

TAKING SOCIAL INNOVATION TO SCALE

Meg Wheatley and Deborah Frieze co-authored this article about the role of emergence in taking social innovation to scale. Here is an excerpt.

What is Emergence?

Emergence violates so many of our Western assumptions of how change happens that it often takes quite a while to understand it. In nature, change never happens as a result of top-down, pre-conceived strategic plans, or from the mandate of any single individual or boss. Change begins as local actions spring up simultaneously in many different areas. If these changes remain disconnected, nothing happens beyond each locale. However, when they become connected, local actions can emerge as a powerful system with influence at a more global or comprehensive level. (Global here means a larger scale, not necessarily the entire planet.)

Using EmergenceThis article by Meg Wheatley and Deborah Frieze explores the lifecycle of emergence (PDF, 504K)

These powerful emergent phenomena appear suddenly and surprisingly. Think about how the Berlin Wall suddenly came down, how the Soviet Union ended, how corporate power quickly came to dominate globally. In each case, there were many local actions and decisions, most of which were invisible and unknown to each other, and none of which was powerful enough by itself to create change. But when these local changes coalesced, new power emerged. What could not be accomplished by diplomacy, politics, protests, or strategy suddenly happened. And when each materialized, most were surprised. Emergent phenomena always have these characteristics: They exert much more power than the sum of their parts; they always possess new capacities different from the local actions that engendered them; they always surprise us by their appearance.

It is important to note that emergence always results in a powerful system that has many more capacities than could ever be predicted by analyzing the individual parts. We see this in the behavior of hive insects such as bees and termites.  Individual ants possess none of the intelligence or skills that are in the hive. No matter how intently scientists study the behavior of individual ants, they can never see the behavior of the hive. Yet once the hive forms, each ant acts with the intelligence and skillfulness of the whole.

This aspect of emergence has profound implications for social entrepreneurs. Instead of developing them individually as leaders and skillful practitioners, we would do better to connect them to like-minded others and create the conditions for emergence. The skills and capacities needed by them will be found in the system that emerges, not in better training programs.

Because emergence only happens through connections, Berkana has developed a four-stage model that catalyzes connections as the means to achieve global level change: Name, Connect, Nourish, Illuminate. We focus on discovering pioneering efforts and naming them as such. We then connect these efforts to other similar work globally. We nourish this network in many ways, but most essentially through creating opportunities for learning and sharing experiences and shifting into communities of practice. We also illuminate these pioneering efforts so that many more people will learn from them. We are attempting to work intentionally with emergence so that small, local efforts can become a global force for change.

http://www.walkoutwalkon.net/walking-out-on/lifecycle-of-emergence/

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