Archiv

Umwelt

Critics: Rich Polluters—Including U.S.—Should Face Sanctions for Rejecting Binding Emissions Cuts
Share

Talks at the United Nations Climate Change Conference are in their second to last day, but little progress appears to have been made on the key issues of extending the Kyoto Protocol or forming a Green Climate Fund. The United States is refusing to accept any deal involving binding emissions cuts before the year 2020 despite dire warnings that the world can’t afford to wait. We get analysis from Pablo Solón, Bolivia’s former ambassador to the United Nations and former chief negotiator on climate change, and from Patrick Bond, a South African climate activist, professor and author. „The main issue, that is the number, the figure of emission reductions of rich countries, is not really being raised,“ Solón says. „It’s very, very low… You cannot be silent when you see that genocide and ecocide is going to happen because of this kind of decisions.“ Solón also says the U.S. „blackmails“ developing countries into dropping demands for binding cuts by threatening to withdraw climate aid. Bond says the next round of climate talks should include the idea of sanctions against major polluters, like the United States, that reject binding cuts. [includes rush transcript]
Filed under Durban Climate Summit 2011, Climate Change, Global Warming
LISTEN
WATCH

Real Video Stream

Real Audio Stream

MP3 Download

More…

Email to a friend

Help

Printer-friendly version

Purchase DVD/CD

Guests:
Patrick Bond, South African climate activist and professor. He is the director of the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban. He is author of two new books, Durban’s Climate Gamble: Playing the Carbon Markets, Betting the Earth and Politics of Climate Justice: Paralysis Above, Movement Below.
Pablo Solon, Bolivia’s former ambassador to the United Nations. He also served as Bolivia’s chief negotiator on climate change.
Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, chair of the Africa Group, representing 54 African nations at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Durban, South Africa. Mpanu-Mpanu is from the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Related stories
„His Nickname Is George W. Obama“: Leading Climate Change Denier Embraces U.S. Stance at U.N. Talks
Entrepreneur: Capitalism Will Save World from Climate Crisis to Preserve Markets for iPads, Coke
Nobel-Winning IPCC Chair Rajendra Pachauri Urges Obama to „Listen to Science“ on Global Warming
Least Developed Countries, Small Island States Face U.S. Resistance to Binding Climate Deal
Tuvalu Minister Urges World Leaders to Save Pacific Nations from Rising Seas
Rush Transcript
This transcript is available free of charge. However, donations help us provide closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing on our TV broadcast. Thank you for your generous contribution.
Donate
Related Links
See all of Democracy Now!’s Reports from the UN Climate Change Conference in Durban

AMY GOODMAN: To talk more about the climate change talks, we’re joined right now by two guests. Pablo Solón is Bolivia’s former ambassador to the United Nations, also Bolivia’s former chief negotiator on climate change. Also with us is Patrick Bond from Durban. Patrick is a South African climate activist and professor, director of the Centre for Civil Society at the University in KwaZulu-Natal here in Durban. He is author of two new books, Durban’s Climate Gamble: Playing the Carbon Markets, Betting the Earth and Politics of Climate Justice: Paralysis Above, Movement Below.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Ambassador Solón, well, actually, you’re not ambassador anymore. You’re here really as an activist on the ground. We saw you in Cancún, before that at the People’s Summit in Bolivia. What is happening here right now? As we wrap up, as this conference, the COP 17—it’s officially called the Conference of Parties, others call it the „Conference of Polluters.“ What’s taken place, and what do you make of what Todd Stern, the chief negotiator, said?

PABLO SOLÓN: The key thing is that the main issue, that is the number, the figure of emission reductions of rich countries, is not really being raised. It’s very, very low, like it was in Copenhagen, like it was in Cancún. What they are committing themselves is to reduce only 13 to 17 percent by the year 2020. This will lead the world to an increase in the temperature of more than four degrees Celsius. And that goes beyond any kind of projection that scientists did. Four to six degrees Celsius means a different world by the end of the century. And they are going to do nothing in this decade until 2020.

AMY GOODMAN: You were alone at the Cancún summit, the climate change summit, representing Bolivia in opposing the Cancún Accord, if there was one. Why?

PABLO SOLÓN: Because of this reason: you cannot be silent when you see that genocide and ecocide is going to happen because of this kind of decisions, because, actually, last year, 350,000 persons died because of natural disasters that have to do with climate change. And in my country, in Bolivia, we have lost one-third of the glaciers of our mountains. So, this is already happening. And we haven’t even reached even one degree Celsius of increase in the temperature. Can we imagine what is going to happen if we reach four to six degrees Celsius of increase in the temperature in this century?

AMY GOODMAN: You heard Todd Stern just now, the U.N. climate negotiator, saying this is all a myth, this is simply a false perception that the U.S. is delaying anything until 2020.

PABLO SOLÓN: The U.S. is not only delaying, the U.S. is doing nothing during this decade. Their pledge on the table is only a 3 percent emission reduction from the levels of 1990. So, it’s almost to do nothing. We are going to lose this decade because the U.S. doesn’t want to go on board. And they are pushing so that everybody accepts a new deal that will mean not a stronger Kyoto Protocol, but a weaker Kyoto Protocol.

AMY GOODMAN: What kind of leverage do developing countries have?

PABLO SOLÓN: Developing countries are asking for an emission reduction from 40 to 50 percent. That will secure that at least we are not going to go beyond 1.5 degrees to two degrees Celsius an increase in the temperature. Developing countries have great power in these negotiations, but there is one problem. The U.S. blackmails developing countries. They cut aid when a developing country raises its hands and does discourse against their proposals. This happened to Bolivia two years ago: after Copenhagen, they cut an aid of $3 million. It happened to Ecuador. And it has happened—

AMY GOODMAN: Aid for what? Cutting aid?

PABLO SOLÓN: Aid for climate change.

AMY GOODMAN: For not agreeing with the Copenhagen Accord?

PABLO SOLÓN: Exactly.

AMY GOODMAN: We saw the WikiLeaks documents that came out around the Maldives. Maldives were extremely strong, an extremely vulnerable island, in laying out their case. And in the WikiLeaks documents, it showed they were getting $50 million. And they sort of weakened they’re very public stance.

PABLO SOLÓN: Yeah, that’s exactly what happened. In Cancún, most of the delegations knew that what we were saying was the truth, but they said, „We now have to save the climate negotiation at the multilateral level. In Durban, we will save the climate.“ But we have come here, and the numbers of emission reductions are the same as the ones that were in Copenhagen and in Cancún. So, it’s really unsustainable.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to turn to one key negotiating bloc here at the U.N. climate talks in Durban, the African Group, representing 54 African nations. I spoke with the chair of the African Group—his name is Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu—from the Democratic Republic of Congo and asked him about the refusal to support binding emissions cuts, the U.S. refusal, ’til 2020.

TOSI MPANU-MPANU: 2020, I mean, Africa will be very—in a very dire situation. African farmers today have a hard time coping to the adverse effect of climate change, to which they haven’t contributed. Very severe water stress. They cannot predict rainfall. They have problems with drought, inundations. And it’s about their survival. I’m not sure if by 2020 they will be able to continue with this livelihood they’ve had for many centuries. So we may be—for the sake of good standards of living in the West, a way of life which might not be negotiable, we may be really threatening those poor people, the one billion Africans which have not contributed to this problem. So, by 2020, I think we may see some conflicts in Africa, because some people will have to venture further to get water, muddy water, and where they will go, people will not wait for them with open arms. So there will be conflict because of climate change for which they didn’t contribute.

AMY GOODMAN: Last question: what do you want to see come out of these talks?

TOSI MPANU-MPANU: We want to leave Durban with an ambitious outcome. We know that many issues, especially under the convention track, are not ripe for a legally binding outcome. So maybe success in Durban could be in the form of a clear pathway to reaching this outcome, which will help us resolve part of the problem. The other track of negotiation has been ripe for many years. It’s the track of the Kyoto Protocol, which was signed by the U.S. but never ratified. That Kyoto Protocol—we believe that the parties to the Kyoto Protocol need to commit to a second commitment period of that Kyoto Protocol, because, for us, it represents the instrument of the international climate governance that reflects the highest level of ambition. So we don’t want African soil, we don’t want Durban, to become the graveyard of the Kyoto Protocol. We want to leave here with a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. We want to leave here with an agreement on the Green Climate Fund, and clarity on the whole funding will be mobilized. We want predictability in the climate finance. And, of course, we, as African countries, are willing to do our fair share, as long as we are ensured that means of implementation, in terms of finance, capacity building and technology transfer, will be available. But we are willing to undertake action, although there is no obligation on us.

AMY GOODMAN: The chair of the Africa Group, Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu from the Democratic Republic of Congo. Patrick Bond, you live here in Durban, South Africa. You’re a climate change activist. Talk about the Africa Group.

PATRICK BOND: Well, that’s a very, very telling statement, that our city could be a travesty, the death of the Kyoto Protocol’s binding emissions requirements. And, you know, like the Seattle WTO in 1999, the World Trade Organization again in Cancún 2003, Barcelona climate negotiations 2009, the Africa Groups really can stand up and threaten to walk out and delegitimize the process. That’s really the hope, if, as Pablo says, there’s really no progress, you know, in other words, to really say this is climate injustice. And unfortunately, South Africa may be siding with the North, particularly with the E.U., which wants to maintain a little sort of surface-level appearance of binding, but basically go with a U.S. agenda of very, very weak cuts, no commitments that are binding, and then a failure to deliver with the money, the climate fund and technology and intellectual property rights. So, it looks like a disaster here in Durban.

AMY GOODMAN: Talk about the significance of the South Africa-Ethiopia bloc, in a way—President Meles Zenawi here and, of course, the president of South Africa, as well.

PATRICK BOND: Yeah, it’s true, Amy. And you were mentioning WikiLeaks. And thank goodness that Bradley Manning, who allegedly leaked those, was so strong in making sure we all know what happens in the State Department. The group around Todd Stern, Jonathan Pershing, also went to Meles, to the Ethiopian tyrant, who has killed a couple of hundred of his democracy protesters, and also pushed him to do a U-turn and support the Copenhagen Accord in February 2010. So he’s really not trusted. Matika Mwenda, the head of the Pan African Climate Justice Alliance here, has called Zenawi a sellout of the African agenda. So it’s a very dangerous bloc—South Africa, Ethiopia—against what we anticipate would be, at least up to the last minute, African countries resisting with this terrible deal coming down.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to break, then come back to this discussion. Patrick Bond, among his books, Politics of Climate Justice: Paralysis Above, Movement Below, and Pablo Solón, the former ambassador to the United Nations from Bolivia and the chief climate negotiator, until now, for Bolivia. This is Democracy Now! Back with us.

[break]

 

http://www.democracynow.org/2011/12/8/critics_rich_polluters_including_us_should

5. Dezember 2011, 20:21, NZZ Online

«Neue Welle der Entwaldung»

Das Abholzen der Regenwälder gefährdet den Klimaschutz

Tropischer Regenwald, Mata Atlantica, Brasilien. (Bild: imago)ZoomTropischer Regenwald, Mata Atlantica, Brasilien. (Bild: imago)

Das Abholzen der Regenwälder in Südamerika und Afrika gefährdet nach Ansicht von Umweltschutzexperten den weltweiten Klimaschutz. So warnte die Organisation WWF am Montag in Durban vor der Zerstörung von riesigen Flächen brasilianischer Regenwälder.

(dpa) Die Stiftung «African Wildlife Foundation» hat auf dem 17. Uno-Klimagipfel in Durban berichtet, dass auch Afrika derzeit eine «neue Welle der Entwaldung» erlebe. Ein neues Waldschutzgesetz in Brasilien ermögliche die Vernichtung von 76,5 Millionen Hektar Wald, heisst es der WWF-Mitteilung. Die Fläche hätte die Grösse Deutschlands, Österreichs und Italiens zusammen.

«Ein Albtraum für die Artenvielfalt»

Brasilien stehe vor einem «neuen gewaltigen Kahlschlag, der das Weltklima mit bis zu 28 Milliarden Tonnen CO2 zusätzlich aufheizen würde», sagte WWF-Waldreferent Roberto Maldonado. Das entspräche etwa dem Treibhausgasausstoss von Deutschland in 30 Jahren. Das neue Gesetz sei «ein Albtraum für die Artenvielfalt» und habe enorme Folgen für das Weltklima.

Das Verschwinden von Wäldern und Feuchtgebieten in Afrika schwäche weiter das gesamte Ökosystem, betonte die Präsidentin der «African Wildlife Foundation», Helen Gichohi. Zwischen 1995 und 2005 seien in Afrika südlich der Sahelzone neun Prozent der Wälder vernichtet worden; das bedeute etwa 40’000 Quadratkilometer Wald pro Jahr.

Wachsende Verwüstung müsse aufgehalten werden

«Es ist wichtig, die Wälder Afrikas zu retten, sowohl um den Klimawandel zu bremsen als auch um die wachsende Verwüstung aufzuhalten», meinte der Chef des Zentrums für internationale Forstwissenschaft, Frances Seymour. Davon hänge die Lebensgrundlage von Millionen von Afrikanern ab.

5. Dezember 2011, 20:21, NZZ Online

«Neue Welle der Entwaldung»

Das Abholzen der Regenwälder gefährdet den Klimaschutz

Tropischer Regenwald, Mata Atlantica, Brasilien. (Bild: imago)ZoomTropischer Regenwald, Mata Atlantica, Brasilien. (Bild: imago)

Das Abholzen der Regenwälder in Südamerika und Afrika gefährdet nach Ansicht von Umweltschutzexperten den weltweiten Klimaschutz. So warnte die Organisation WWF am Montag in Durban vor der Zerstörung von riesigen Flächen brasilianischer Regenwälder.

(dpa) Die Stiftung «African Wildlife Foundation» hat auf dem 17. Uno-Klimagipfel in Durban berichtet, dass auch Afrika derzeit eine «neue Welle der Entwaldung» erlebe. Ein neues Waldschutzgesetz in Brasilien ermögliche die Vernichtung von 76,5 Millionen Hektar Wald, heisst es der WWF-Mitteilung. Die Fläche hätte die Grösse Deutschlands, Österreichs und Italiens zusammen.

«Ein Albtraum für die Artenvielfalt»

Brasilien stehe vor einem «neuen gewaltigen Kahlschlag, der das Weltklima mit bis zu 28 Milliarden Tonnen CO2 zusätzlich aufheizen würde», sagte WWF-Waldreferent Roberto Maldonado. Das entspräche etwa dem Treibhausgasausstoss von Deutschland in 30 Jahren. Das neue Gesetz sei «ein Albtraum für die Artenvielfalt» und habe enorme Folgen für das Weltklima.

Das Verschwinden von Wäldern und Feuchtgebieten in Afrika schwäche weiter das gesamte Ökosystem, betonte die Präsidentin der «African Wildlife Foundation», Helen Gichohi. Zwischen 1995 und 2005 seien in Afrika südlich der Sahelzone neun Prozent der Wälder vernichtet worden; das bedeute etwa 40’000 Quadratkilometer Wald pro Jahr.

Wachsende Verwüstung müsse aufgehalten werden

«Es ist wichtig, die Wälder Afrikas zu retten, sowohl um den Klimawandel zu bremsen als auch um die wachsende Verwüstung aufzuhalten», meinte der Chef des Zentrums für internationale Forstwissenschaft, Frances Seymour. Davon hänge die Lebensgrundlage von Millionen von Afrikanern ab.

http://www.nzz.ch/nachrichten/politik/international/durban_1.13527082.html

 

Key issues at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP17, remain unresolved, including the future of the Kyoto Protocol, the international treaty with enforceable provisions designed to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Delegates are also debating how to form a Green Climate Fund to support developing nations most affected by climate change. We begin not inside the summit, but out in the streets of Durban, where thousands of people marched on Saturday calling for climate justice. „We are here to send a solid, strong message, simple message to the leaders and negotiators at the climate change conference that this is no time to play around,“ says award-winning Nigerian environmental activist Nnimmo Bassey. „This is a time for a real commitment to cut emissions, a legally binding agreement to cut emissions, as such that rich, polluting countries should understand that their inaction…will destroy the planet… We can’t accept that.“ [includes rush transcript]

http://www.democracynow.org/2011/12/5/thousands_march_at_un_climate_summit

Proteste gegen Minenprojekt

Perus Präsident rief Ausnahmezustand in Bergbauregion aus

05. Dezember 2011 09:10

Demonstrationen seit elf Tagen

Lima – Der peruanische Präsident Ollanta Humala hat angesichts heftiger Proteste und Streiks in einer Bergbauregion im Norden des Landes den Ausnahmezustand ausgerufen. Er verhänge einen Ausnahmezustand in den Provinzen Cajamarca, Celendin, Hualgayoc und Contumaza, erklärte der linksgerichtete Politiker am Sonntag. Die Maßnahme werde um Mitternacht in Kraft treten und für 60 Tage gelten. Der Ausnahmezustand erlaubt den Einsatz der Armee zur Sicherung der Ordnung und schränkt das Demonstrationsrecht ein.

In der Provinz von Cajamarca demonstrieren seit elf Tagen Einwohner gegen das Bergbauprojekt von Conga des US-Minenkonzerns Newmont. Mit 4,8 Milliarden Dollar (3,55 Milliarden Euro) bis 2014 ist das Projekt zum Abbau von Gold und Kupfer derzeit die größte Investition im peruanischen Bergbausektor. Örtliche Umweltgruppen befürchten eine Verunreinigung des Grundwassers. Einer Delegation unter Führung von Ministerpräsident Salomon Lerner war es in fünf Tagen nicht gelungen, eine Einigung mit den örtlichen Protestführern zu erzielen. (APA)

Klimakonferenz in Durban

Merkel glaubt nicht mehr an Durchbruch

"Löst die Klima-Krise!": Umwelt-Aktivisten demonstrieren bei der Uno-Konferenz in Durban

Zur Großansicht
AFP

„Löst die Klima-Krise!“: Umwelt-Aktivisten demonstrieren bei der Uno-Konferenz in Durban

Das Kyoto-Protokoll läuft 2012 ab, ein neues Klimaschutzabkommen muss her. Doch eine Woche nach Beginn des Uno-Gipfels in Durban herrscht Pessimismus: Europa könne die Erderwärmung nicht allein aufhalten, sagt Angela Merkel – und ein weltweiter Konsens ist derzeit unwahrscheinlich.

Info
Aus Datenschutzgründen wird Ihre IP-Adresse nur dann gespeichert, wenn Sie angemeldeter und eingeloggter Facebook-Nutzer sind. Wenn Sie mehr zum Thema Datenschutz wissen wollen, klicken Sie auf das i.

Durban/Berlin – Seit Montag beraten Politiker und Experten aus aller Welt darüber, welche Richtlinien gelten sollen, wenn die Klimaschutzvereinbarungen von Kyoto Ende 2012 auslaufen. Und die Skepsis gegenüber dem 17. UN-Klimagipfel in Durban wächst. Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel (CDU) dämpfte am Samstag erneut die Erwartungen an die Konferenz, zu der etwa 20.000 Delegierte, Experten und Gäste aus 191 Ländern gekommen sind.

ANZEIGE
< script language=“JavaScript“ src=“http://ad-emea.doubleclick.net/adj/N1657.spiegel.iopt/B6077741.3;sz=300×250;ord=2011.12.03.19.54.11?“ type=“text/javascript“></script>

„Wir wissen, dass die Schwellenländer zurzeit nicht bereit sind, bindende Reduktionsverpflichtungen im Bereich der CO2-Emission einzugehen“, sagte Merkel in ihrer wöchentlichen Videobotschaft im Internet. Europa werde weiter bindende Verpflichtungen haben, könne aber das Klimaproblem der Welt nicht alleine lösen. Deshalb gehe es jetzt in Durban vor allem darum, „den Ländern, die am stärksten betroffen sind, die mehr für Klimaschutz machen müssen, eine schnelle Finanzierung bestimmter Projekte zu ermöglichen“.

Die Umweltorganisation Greenpeace kritisierte Merkel scharf und warf ihr vor, sich nicht entschieden genug für eine härtere Gangart Europas bei den Konferenzverhandlungen einzusetzen. Die Kanzlerin müsse sich „gegen die kurzsichtigen Interessen“ der Öl-, Auto- und Kohleindustrie stellen, forderte Greenpeace-Klimaexperte Martin Kaiser in Durban. Merkel dürfe sich nicht hinter der Verweigerungshaltung der USA verstecken.

„Es ist falsch, dass Deutschland vor dem Start der eigentlichen Verhandlungen schon die Arena räumen will“, kritisierte auch die WWF-Klimaexpertin Regine Guenther. Es helfe niemandem, die möglichen Fortschritte von vornherein niederzureden. „Mit dieser Haltung wird man die festgefahrenen Verhandlungen kaum wieder flottbekommen.“

Klimapolitik in Trümmern

Auch die meisten anderen Umweltverbände zogen zur Halbzeit der UN-Konferenz eine skeptische Bilanz. „Wesentliche Elemente der internationale Klimapolitik drohen hier zertrümmert zu werden“, warnte Germanwatch-Chef Christoph Bais. Wenn sich das Blatt nicht noch wende, werde es kein Mandat für ein neues, international rechtlich verbindliches Klimaabkommen geben. Zudem könne auch das Ziel, die Erderwärmung bis 2100 auf zwei Grad zu begrenzen, kaum noch erreicht werden. Der europäischen Ratspräsidentschaft (Polen) scheine der Wille zu fehlen, den Klimaschutz entscheidend voranzubringen. Dabei wäre das auch eine Antwort auf die Wirtschaftskrise weltweit.

Der Bund für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland (BUND) sieht keine substantiellen Fortschritte in Durban. Die vorliegenden Vorschläge sähen keine konkreten Zahlen zur Minderung der CO2-Emissionen in den Industriestaaten vor. Deutschland und die EU müssten sich für die Fortführung des Kyoto-Abkommens nach 2012 einsetzen, forderte der Verband.

Die Wirtschaftskrise und halbherzige politische Entscheidungen erschweren nach Ansicht des Karlsruher Klimaforschers Hans Schipper den Fortschritt im Klimaschutz. „Im Mittelpunkt der Debatte steht zurzeit der Satz ‚Die Wirtschaft darf nicht leiden'“. Da ist es schwer, die Bevölkerung für den Klimaschutz zu begeistern“, sagte Schipper vom Süddeutschen Klimabüro am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT). Deshalb hofft er auf ein klares Signal der Europäer in Durban für den Klimaschutz. Schipper warnte aber davor, die Menschen mit Horror-Szenarien von der Notwendigkeit des Klimaschutzes überzeugen zu wollen.

„Alte Taktiken und Schachzüge“

Der Präsident des Umweltbundesamts, Jochen Flasbarth, kritisierte den Verhandlungsstil der Europäer auf Klimakonferenzen. Länder wie China würden die Europäer mit ihren „alten Taktiken und Schachzügen“ nicht mehr ernst nehmen, sagte Flasbarth der „Welt“. Für Europäer seien Verhandlungen nur erfolgreich, wenn sie mit einer Unterzeichnung endeten, meinte er. „Die Chinesen denken da ganz anders.“

Aber auch bei den Verhandlungen mit den USA müssten die Europäer weniger auf die moralischen Aspekte als vielmehr auf den wirtschaftlichen Nutzen des Kampfes gegen die Klimaerwärmung setzen. „Moralische Appelle beeindrucken die Amerikaner wenig.“

Dass in den kommenden Tagen ein neues Klimaschutzprogramm ausgehandelt werden könnte, daran glauben inzwischen offenbar nur noch die wenigsten. Trotz der Kritik von allen Seiten gab sich Christiana Figueres, die Chefin des UN-Klimasekretariats, am Samstag zuversichtlich. Die Verhandlungen konzentrierten sich derzeit auf die Gestaltung der Verpflichtungen nach dem Auslaufen des Kyoto-Protokolls, so Figueres. Es gehe in dieser Woche nicht um das Ob sondern um das Wie.

Bundeskanzlerin Merkel ist da anderer Meinung: Bei der wichtigen Frage der Verlängerung des Kyoto-Protokolls seien leider keine Fortschritte zu erwarten, sagte sie in ihrer Videobotschaft. Vorankommen könne man in Durban aber bei der Finanzierung bestimmter Umweltschutzprojekte. „Es geht darum, dass das Waldmanagement auf der Welt verbessert wird“, sagte sie. Denn Wälder seien wichtige Speicher für Kohlendioxid.

Die Konferenz tagt seit Montag in Durban und endet am 9. Dezember.

jus/dpa/dapd/AFP/Reuters

http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/mensch/0,1518,801532,00.html

FLUGHAFEN
Aufstand der Millionäre gegen den Fluglärm

        </p>
<p>Proben den Aufstand in den Villen: Konstantin Zoggolis, Andrea Müller-Wüst und Julia Mierke (von links).<br />

Proben den Aufstand in den Villen: Konstantin Zoggolis, Andrea Müller-Wüst und Julia Mierke (von links).
Foto: Bernd Fickert

Ob reich oder arm – Krach trifft alle: Auf dem Frankfurter Lerchesberg wächst die Wut. Über den Villen von Chefärzten, Bankiers und Notaren steuern im Minutentakt Flugzeuge die neue Nordwestlandebahn an.

Doktor Krstic sitzt an seinem Esstisch, massives Holz, sehr edel, der Doktor lehnt sich zurück im Lederstuhl, er trinkt Cappuccino. Vor den bodentiefen Fenstern liegt ein gepflegter Rasen, daneben steht eine Trauerweide, dahinter die halbfertige Villa von Ioannis Amanatidis. Natürlich habe er keine Kontakte zu Al-Kaida, sagt Krstic, 48, aber wenn er sie hätte: Es gebe oben das Zimmer mit den Dachfenstern. Er würde es vermieten. Da könnten die mit ihren Gewehren dann machen. Flugzeuge kämen ja genug.

„Wenn der Euro zusammenbricht, dann ist ja eh alles vorbei. Dann hänge ich mir einen Pflug ans Auto und reiße diese Landebahn auf“, sagt Milivoj Krstic. „Dann gibt es soziale Unruhen.“

Es kann also gut sein, dass sie hier oben beginnen, Nobelring, Lerchesberg, Frankfurts feinste Adresse – noch. Seit dem 21. Oktober fliegen über dem Lerchesberg im Minutentakt die Flugzeuge zur neuen Nordwestlandebahn. Seitdem sprechen sie hier oben weniger über die schönen Dinge des guten Lebens, über Porsche und Sterne-Küche. Seitdem geht es um Grundrechte, um Demokratie. Um den kommenden Aufstand.

„Was wir hier erleben, ist eine kalte Enteignung“

Auf dem Lerchesberg leben Frankfurts oberste Zehntausend, in den Villen am Briandring und Nobelring haben sich Chefärzte eingerichtet und erfolgreiche Geschäftsleute, Konsuln, Notare, Bankiers. Die CDU kann hier auf eine treue Wählerschaft zurückgreifen, vor allem aber auf Menschen, die einer Stadt viel Stabilität geben, weil sie Unternehmen leiten, die Arbeitsplätze schaffen. Wer hier wohnt, geht abends auch mal dorthin, wo man Oberbürgermeisterin Petra Roth trifft oder Innenminister Boris Rhein (CDU), man kennt sich aus dem Wirtschaftsclub, sofern man nicht gerade ausgetreten ist, wie Doktor Krstic.

2500 Menschen bei Fluglärm-Montags-Demo

Bildergalerie ( 10 Bilder )

Auf Roth und Rhein ist er nicht mehr gut zu sprechen. Und schon gar nicht auf den ehemaligen Ministerpräsidenten Roland Koch. „Was wir hier erleben, ist eine kalte Enteignung“, sagt Krstic’ Frau Julia Mierke, 30, sie könnten ihre Häuser ja nicht mehr verkaufen, und Fraport nehme sie nicht, jedenfalls nicht zu dem Preis, den sie wert sind. Und drin zu wohnen sei unmöglich. „Es ist ja nicht nur der Lärm, es sind auch die Emissionen. Keiner spricht darüber, wie schädlich das ist, was da runterkommt“, sagt Mierke. Ihre Kinder lasse sie nicht mehr draußen spielen. Und nachts wachten sie auf: „Mama, mir ist laut.“

180 Meter über Normalnull

Von nebenan, zwei Villen weiter, kommt Konstantin Zoggolis vorbei, er ist Ingenieur. Die Flughöhe sei eine Verarschung, sagt er, weil von Normalnull ausgegangen werde, obwohl der Lerchesberg 180 Meter über Normalnull liege. Zoggolis, 55, erzürnen die Tricks, mit denen Fraport und Flugsicherung arbeiteten. So werde schon seit Wochen auch bei Rückenwind jenseits der Fünf-Knoten-Grenze gelandet, obwohl das gefährlich sei. Am 21. November hätten deshalb mehrere Flieger durchstarten müssen, weil die Piloten die Maschinen gar nicht runterbekommen hätten.

Die Flugsicherung aber sage, es habe einen Vogelschlag gegeben. „Da wird gelogen“, sagt Zoggolis. „Mal müssen wir dran glauben, mal die Flörsheimer. Die wollen uns gegeneinander ausspielen. Da ist dann auch die Sicherheit egal.“

Montags-Demonstration in Frankfurt (21.11.)

Bildergalerie ( 20 Bilder )

Der Doktor und seine Frau, Zoggolis und Nachbarin Andrea Müller-Wüst haben mit Piloten gesprochen, die sie kennen, sie haben bei der Flugsicherung angerufen und bei Fraport, sie haben bei Rhein angefragt, bei Roth, bei Koch. Und sind zu dem Ergebnis gekommen, dass das System, mit dem sie immer gut gelebt haben, gar nicht das ist, für das sie es gehalten haben. „Wir sind umgeben von Korruption“, sagt Mierke. „Wie kann es sein, dass bei der Flugsicherung auch Fraport-Leute sitzen? Dass Koch den Ausbau beschließt und dann Chef der Firma wird, die ihn umsetzt? Dass die Oberbürgermeisterin dieser Stadt dazu nichts zu sagen hat?“

Die Villenbesitzer bereiten Klagen vor

Krstic und Mierke haben schon ihre Grundsteuer zurückgebucht, jetzt bereiten sie Klagen vor, vernetzen sich mit den anderen Villenbesitzern, mit Offenbachern und Flörsheimern. „Es darf nicht passieren, dass sie uns gegeneinander aufbringen“, sagt Zoggolis. Das Planfeststellungsverfahren sei schon eine Farce gewesen, die Mediation eine Lüge. „Aber wir werden uns weiter wehren.“

Lesermeinungen zu neuer Landebahn und Fluglärm
weiter »
Mieses Verhalten gegenüber Bürgern

Mein 14 Monate altes Enkelkind wohnt in Oberrad und hat jetzt den Dauerlärm über sich. Die Messstationen in Oberrad melden Lärmpegel bis über 80 Dezibel. Den schönen Scheerwald-Spielplatz kann man nicht mehr benutzen. Was soll eigentlich aus den Kindern werden, die unter diesem Lärmteppich aufwachsen? Viele Kindergärten und Schulen liegen in diesen vom Fluglärm betroffenen Bereichen. Das Verhalten dieser Oberbürgermeisterin gegenüber den Bürgern des Frankfurter Südens kann ich nur noch als mies bezeichnen. Nur die Interessen der Wirtschaft, nicht die der Bürger werden vertreten. Die Bürger hätten die Freiheit wegzuziehen? Wie stellt Frau Roth sich das eigentlich vor?Hedda Topp, Frankfurt

Die neue Landebahn muss stillgelegt werden

Zu dem nun eingetretenen Lärmterror auch bei uns in Frankfurt kann es nur eine Forderung geben: Es muss politisch entschieden werden, dass diese Landebahn so bald wie möglich wieder stillgelegt wird. Wenn das nicht möglich ist, sollten die lärmgeplagten Menschen in Hessen ein Volksbegehren auf den Weg bringen, um dieses Ziel zu erreichen.
Dieter Hooge, Frankfurt

Die Tage sind völlig unerträglich geworden

Ein Lärmteppich hängt über Frankfurts südlichen Stadtteilen und das ist kein Lärm, an den man sich gewöhnen könnte. Auch bei geschlossenen Fenstern dröhnt es in den Wohnungen, Klassenzimmern. Nein, so krass hatte man sich die zusätzliche Belastung durch die neue Landebahn absolut nicht vorgestellt. Häufig höre ich die Frage, was die Diskussion um ein Nachtflugverbot überhaupt solle, wenn doch schon der Tag völlig unerträglich geworden sei. Nach dem ersten Schock beginnt man sich zu organisieren. Überall wird verbittert konstatiert, dass „die Politiker“ der regierenden Parteien sich nicht in den betroffenen Stadtteilen blicken lassen. Stuttgart 21 hört man überall und so steht zu vermuten, dass die gequälten Anwohner sich – sehr laut und sehr deutlich – in ihrer Stadt und auf „ihrem Flughafen“ bemerkbar machen werden. Michael Burkhardt, Frankfurt

Der Lärm durch Straße und Schiene ist stärker

Mich stört, dass das Lärmproblem vielfach mit zweierlei Elle gemessen wird. Die Flughafengegner fokussieren ihren Widerstand nur auf das Argument Fluglärm beziehungsweise Nachtflugverbot. Kein Wort über sonstige Lärmbelästigungen. Alle Untersuchungen belegen, dass der Lärm durch Straße und Schiene wesentlich stärker ist. Wir müssen mit dem Flugplatz leben. Bürger, die an Hauptstraßen oder Bahnstrecken leben, müssen auch mit dem dortigen Lärm leben. Soll ihretwegen nun ein allgemeines „Nachtfahrverbot“ ausgesprochen werden, also Stopp auf der Autobahn oder an der Bahn von 22 bis 6 Uhr? Absurd! Genau so wie die ganze Fluglärmdiskussion!
Eberhard Deparade, Frankfurt

Wir sind verzweifelt

Ein guter Teil des Frankfurter Südens, Oberrad, Sachsenhausen, Niederrad wird unerträglich verlärmt. Menschen können nicht mehr schlafen, beziehungsweise werden gleich um 5 Uhr geweckt, Tag für Tag, Wochenende für Wochenende. Über die Kinder möchte ich gar nicht reden, da kommen mir gleich die Tränen. Wir sind verzweifelt.Judith Sachs, Frankfurt

Es wird Zeit für eine Quittung à la Stuttgart 21

Die neue Landebahn und die Neuordnung des Luftraums nehmen den Frankfurter Süden als Geisel. Das Naherholungsgebiet Wald ist seit dem 21. Oktober vollkommen verseucht. Jetzt gibt es gar keinen Flecken mehr, wo man die Ruhe im Stadtwald genießen kann. Nicht genug, jetzt können wir noch nicht einmal mit unseren Kinder auf den Spielplatz. Es kann doch nicht sein, dass wir mit Ohrstöpseln tagsüber herumlaufen. Die etablierten Parteien in der Frankfurter Stadtregierung sind eine Farce. Es wird Zeit für eine Quittung à la Stuttgart 21.
Yven Hunt, Frankfurt

Brutale Hoffnung auf Abstumpfung

Ostwetterlage – ich verspreche ihnen, das wird sich bald wieder ändern!“ so Fraport-Chef Stefan Schulte zu den völlig entsetzten und neu betroffenen Bürgern im Westen des Rhein-Main-Gebietes. Er will sagen, wenn erst wieder „normaler“ Westwind vorherrscht, bekommen schon die den Lärm ab, die seit Jahrzehnten zugelärmt werden. Im Süden Offenbachs, in Neu Isenburg, nun auch in Offenbachs Innenstadt. Diese an Zynismus nicht zu überbietende Äußerung entspringt hoher Not oder der brutalen Hoffnung auf Abstumpfung der Menschen durch Wiederholung. Es sind aber nicht einfach nur Andere betroffen, es sind immer mehr betroffen. Die Steigerung beginnt gerade erst. Welches Potenzial noch im Ausbau liegt, hat das Mediationsverfahren 2001 bereits aufgezeigt. Sie wird mit Sicherheit kommen. Nach einer Schamfrist. Agnes Stockmann, Offenbach

Wem gehört die Luft über uns?

Dem der Boden gehört, der verantwortet ihn, er gestaltet ihn, pflegt ihn, macht ihn nutzbar. Wem aber gehört die Luft über uns? Uns allen doch bis jetzt und den Vögeln, der Sonne, dem Licht. Doch plötzlich ist unser Himmel besetzt, erobert von Lärm, diesem Drachen mit feurigem Rauch. Es hat uns beraubt, das Ungetier, es stiehlt uns die Ruhe, den Frieden, den Tag. Er nimmt uns die Freiheit im Kopf, weil die Gedanken gekettet sind an den Schmerz. Worte verschwinden, Musik ist verstummt. Unser Körper bleibt nicht unversehrt, unser Geist nicht länger selbst bestimmt. Selbst in der Ruhe kriecht in uns die Angst, denn der Drache schläft nicht, er tobt nur auf der anderen Seite des Himmels. Und morgen schon, ganz früh, erschreckt uns wieder sein Gebrüll. Steht am Ende Flucht und Vertreibung? Nein, nein, wir nicht, nein! Das Untier muss vertrieben sein!
Peter Hartwig, Gustavsburg

Doktor Krstic sagt, er sei kein Linker, nie gewesen, er habe noch nie in seinem Leben gegen irgendetwas demonstriert. Aber das ändere sich gerade, auch wenn sein Anti-Fraport-Aufkleber am Schild seiner Praxis in der Goethestraße ständig abgerissen werde. „Wir werden uns nicht gefallen lassen, dass der Profit eines einzelnen Unternehmens über das Wohl der Menschen gestellt wird.“ Julia Mierke sagt, die Gewaltbereitschaft steige. „Die Leute haben nichts mehr zu verlieren.“

Climate deal pushed by poorest nations

Some of the LDCs are at risk of inundation if sea levels rise as forecast

The world’s poorest countries have asked that talks on a new climate deal covering all nations begin immediately.

At the UN climate summit, the Least Developed Countries bloc and small island states tabled papers saying the deal should be finalised within a year.

Many of them are vulnerable to climate impacts such as drought or inundation.

The move puts the blocs on a collision course not only with many rich nations, but also with developing world partners such as China, India and Brazil.

These three developing world giants believe talks on a new mandate should not begin now because developed nations have yet to fulfil existing commitments.

But their smaller peers believe there is no time to lose.

„We put forward our mandate for a new legal agreement today to get things moving quickly in an effort to respond to the urgency of our challenge,“ said Selwin Hart, lead negotiator for Barbados, speaking for the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis).

„We can no longer afford to wait. We need to conclude the new deal in the next 12 months.“
Water woes

India and The Maldives have a common agenda on many things – but maybe not on climate

The 48-country Least Developed Countries bloc (LDCs) includes drought-prone states such as Ethiopia and Mali, those with long flat coastal zones such as Bangladesh and Tanzania, and Himalayan mountain states including Bhutan and Nepal for whom melting glaciers pose serious dangers.

The 39-strong Aosis includes a plethora of Pacific and Caribbean islands, some of which are very low-lying and vulnerable to sea level rise.

The draft mandate that the LDCs launched into the current UN summit in Durban, South Africa, says that talks „shall begin immediately after 1 January 2012 and shall conclude… by COP18 (next year’s summit)“.

„All Parties must take urgent action to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and set a long term goal so as to hold the increase in global average temperature below 1.5C above pre-industrial levels and stabilise greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere below 350 parts per million of carbon dioxide equivalent (350ppm CO2e),“ it continues.
Continue reading the main story
Climate change glossary
Select a term to learn more:
Adaptation
Adaptation
Action that helps cope with the effects of climate change – for example construction of barriers to protect against rising sea levels, or conversion to crops capable of surviving high temperatures and drought.
Glossary in full

The 1.5C goal is tougher than the 2C goal originally tabled by the European Union and subsequently adopted at last year’s UN conference in Mexico.

But 1.5C is supported by more than half of the world’s governments, including members of the LDCs and Aosis.

However, stabilising at 350ppm CO2e is a very demanding target, given that the current concentration is more than 450ppm.

The LDC draft mandate continues: „The negotiations shall also be guided by the fact that in order to achieve the long term goal, global emissions should peak by no later than 2015 and will need to be reduced by at least 85% below 1990 levels by 2050.“

Measures stemming from the new mandate should „operate alongside“ emission cuts made under the Kyoto Protocol.

The Aosis draft is much shorter but makes the same essential point – that negotiators should „develop and finalise a Protocol or other legally binding and ratifiable instrument(s) under the Convention to be presented for adoption by the COP at its 18th session“.
Degrees of separation

Brazil and India have argued that no new process should begin before 2015; and China is also known to be resistant.
Continue reading the main story
Durban climate conference
Summit will attempt to agree the road map for a future global deal on reducing carbon emissions
Developing countries are insisting rich nations pledge further emission cuts under the Kyoto Protocol
Delegates also aim to finalise some deals struck at last year’s summit
These include speeding up the roll-out of clean technology to developing nations…
… and a system for managing the Green Climate Fund, scheduled to gather and distribute billions of dollars per year to developing countries
Progress may also be made on funding forest protection

Along with Canada, the US, Japan and Russia, they have also argued that the current pledges on curbing emissions, which most countries tabled around the time of the Copenhagen summit two years ago and which run until 2020, should not be adjusted before that date.

But the UNFCCC is obliged to review those pledges in 2015; and the LDCs believe the 1.5C target will be very difficult if not impossible to achieve without strengthening the existing pledges.

In the past, the developing world has resisted endorsing a global target for emissions in 2050, as it implies that developing countries will have to accept binding cuts.

The LDCs and Aosis are used to finding themselves in the opposite corner to the US and other developed nations.

But going up against the might of fellow developing countries is a relatively new experience, and has been taken only because they did not see their interests as compatible with the waiting strategy of India, Brazil and China.

„Delaying a new agreement or deeper targets until 2020, as some of the big emitters have proposed, is not an option,“ Mr Hart told BBC News.

„It is quite frankly a dereliction of our collective responsibility to present and future generations.“

The proposals are likely to gain support from the EU and some Latin American nations.

Follow Richard on Twitter

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15992519